What Christmas Really Means

Right after Thanksgiving (or earlier,) we start to be actively bombarded with the capitalist message that we’ve got to start buying or we’ll be left behind somehow. The same-old wash, rinse, repeat holiday symbols get dragged through the incessant media just for the almighty dollar. How do we defend ourselves from this annual capitalist trap? Just like it is with everything good and right, Satan tries to dirty and ruin things that are special.

We are also urged to keep Christ in Christmas on a constant basis. We try each year, but do we really succeed? 

Have we been touched in our hearts to become more Christlike? 

I am not saying scrap the whole Santa notion. That rotund jolly old generous fellow has treated me well in the past. He remains to be a beloved symbol of the giving and charity that we embrace especially at this time of year. It’s just fine to celebrate a white-bearded Santa and flying reindeer and evergreens covered with sparkly lights as long as we retain the intended spirit of the season. Have we been touched so deeply that we are kind and charitable all the time? (I have a strong testimony of the charity possessed by so many. I’ve seen it firsthand! It’s awe inspiring.) It’s okay to enjoy these yearly traditions, as long we keep our hearts turned towards Christ, and the celebration of His time on earth, and what we have received from Him. 

Do we sit through those heart touching services going over our Christmas lists like sugar plums dancing in our heads or meticulously planning the holiday menu, or do we actually give our whole attention to the beauty of the words and music and really think of Him and our true devotion as Christians. I love the depictions of Santa Claus showing love and reverence for the Christchild. They show what Christmas should be. We, including St. Nick, get much joy to give to our loved ones like Christ did (and does.)

We aren’t trying to trick anyone. (One of my daughters felt very betrayed when she discovered the Christmas secret.) Many seasoned parents can tell you that we strive with all our might (and checkbooks) to keep the magic, wonder, and awe alive. Like they said in Prancer the movie, “Christmas is the heart of childhood.” We all revisit our childhood during the holidays through food, shows, and song. That is the appeal of Christmas, even though we think it’s about the giving and getting. No matter your belief level, we all enjoy Christmas and all the cherished family traditions and celebrations that remind us of years gone by.

Family is what it’s all about. 

It is one of Christ’s main teachings. It is very important to Him. So why is it so difficult to be nice to our own family? Try harder during this holiday.

A popular saying in our home is, “If you don’t believe, you don’t receive!” So leave the doubting and humbugging behind. Endeavor to experience genuine joy this year, not stress. If you feel stressed let some less important things go.

There are multiple opinions and practices in regards to Christmas, from gift amount limiting -to- concentrating only on the nativity -to- full on Christmas “Whobalations” with all of the holiday excess and the “roast beast,” whatever that is to you! (“Maybe Christmas, perhaps means a little bit more!”) 

No matter how you choose to celebrate Christ’s birth, do it with an annual renewed sense of giving and kindness that you will retain all year long. “God bless us everyone.” “Where’s the Tylenol?”